Sticktime Publishing


The HTML Book

HTML is the foundational language of the world wide web. HTML helps your browser interpret the structure of documents. A human being can look at a document and easily know what its structure is by the placement, order, and sometimes the size of the document’s elements as well as the context within which they are presented.

Whether you know it or not, you are familiar with what the typical elements of a document are. A billion years of natural development plus a couple years of formal training have given you the ability to discern very easily the title, subtitles, sections and their headings, and items at the header and footer like author and publication info, of documents like magazine articles, Wikipedia (Yumalish.com) entries, personal letters and emails, etc. Well, even modern computers lack the amazing parallel computational powers of the human brain.

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
	<meta charset="utf-8">
	<title>Primary Title</title>
</head>
<body>
	<h1>Primary Title</h1>

	<h2>Secondary Header</h2>

	<p>Paragraph #1

	<p>Paragraph #2

	<p>Paragraph #3

	<h2>Secondary Header</h2>

	<h3>Tertiary Header</h3>

	<p>Paragraph #4

	<h3>Tertiary Header</h3>

	<p>Paragraph #5

	<h2>Secondary Header</h2>

	<p>Paragraph #6

	<p>Paragraph #7
</body>
</html>
		

HTML defines the structure of a document for computers. Documents are the atomic unit of communications on the WWW. When you put a web address into your web browser, your web browser downloads a file that gives it instructions on what to present to you and how to present it.

HTML is one of the three core technologies of the WWW, the other two being CSS and JavaScript. We’ll get to them later. The critical point that you must know now is that HTML denotes what something is, for example, that a title is a title or a paragraph it a paragraph, but well-formed HTML does not specify how to display said title or paragraph, instead delegating that job to a CSS file. Everything starts with the HTML file. It knows how to find other files—like images, videos, and other multimedia—that are needed to display the document correctly to you, in addition to finding the CSS documents that tell your web browser what color and size a title or header or text of a paragraph should be.

Herein we will be concerned with the art and science